Sep 14, 201309:00 AMPoint of View

The METROPOLIS Blog

Lina Bo Bardi’s Personal Modernism

(page 4 of 5)

Another Brazilian architect, and curator, Denise Hochbaum, was studying architecture in Sao Paulo when Bo Bardi was at the peak of her career. Later she wrote at length on Bo Bardi’s renovation of the 1911 Theatro Polytheama. Hochbaum says she’s still inspired by the way Bo Bardi fearlessly approached all her projects, whether it was a new building or a turn of the century structure. “Lina Bo Bardi understood the value of the human element in design, and not just regarding scale and function but in the appreciation of cultural manifestations in relation to the new to come,” she told me recently. “She could easily mix popular circus artifacts with folk elements and image projections when creating a staging design, and this in a time when this freedom to mix such elements was unheard of.”

Lina Bo Bardi’s trailblazing ways left a legacy that resonates with us today. "She was an architect with an unique trajectory, with an understanding of the intrinsic value of human objects, of their potential to contribute to the construction of a better life. And her pioneering awareness of local demands, useful and not harmful to the environment, are all issues that are important in the world we live today," says Latorraca.

Not surprisingly her work is appearing at some of today’s most culturally relevant events, from the Venice Bienale to  the  Hans Ulrich Obrist-curated show, “The Insides are on the Outsides,” that took place at her very own Casa de Vidro.

Sep 14, 2013 05:42 pm
 Posted by  SeanAsh

Nice tour of some of her buildings. But how did you miss the SP Museum of Art????

Bo Bardi was one of my favorite architects, similar to late Le Corbusier, but I will hate it if she comes to prominence now not because of the quality of her work but because of this trendy feminism ('personal' modernism: barf) that she would have hated--like qualifying and beginning this story in terms of Denise Scott Brown. This is where the media does the built world no favors, if this becomes another trite story about the heroic female who goes up against the 'omnipresent' male architects. I'd prefer to see it through the lens of the rest of your story: it's just rich, layered, colorful, brazilian architecture.

All the rest is b.s.

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