About Metropolis

For 35 years, Metropolis has been the architecture and design industry’s most compelling storyteller. Metropolis’ s editorial scope spans design at all scales—from the smallest products to city planning. Metropolis has always sought out, and featured, the game changers in the industry, from emerging talent to established individuals and organizations. And each issue contains stories that link design to evolving cultural trends, from big data to the maker movement. Our readers expect us to take them behind the scenes and share innovations, reveal breakthrough processes, and keep them ahead of the curve.

Metropolis: The Conscience of Our Industry

A Note from Our President

In 1981 Horace Havemeyer III, achieved his dream of publishing a magazine on architecture and design. He called it Metropolis.

Originally, the focus was New York City; it soon expanded to embrace the larger geographic world and all of the design disciplines. Indeed, Metropolis’s editorial scope spans design at all scales—from the smallest products and building types to city planning—and questions: why, how, for whom, and for what?

From the beginning, Horace wanted Metropolis to go beyond the printed word. Thus Metropolis promoted discourse between government planners and private-sector property owners, architects, and, always, the users.

In 1982, there was the seminal conference New York City: Testing the Zoning Proposal. It brought together city planners, private-sector land-use attorneys, developers, architects, and theater-industry owners to explore the impact of proposed zoning changes for New York’s theater district.

In 1989, Metropolis became the founding sponsor of the International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF) and launched a series of annual sessions on current issues, such as branding. The NYC Design Guides, initiated at ICFF, were later replicated at Chicago’s NeoCon trade fair and have become must-have/ must-keep resources for visitors any time of the year in those cities.

In 2006, Tropical Green, a conference in Miami, brought building owners, architects, and academics together to discuss the environmental sustainability of multiple-dwelling and high-rise buildings in hot, humid climates.

Currently, our exclusive Think Tank conversation series enables architects, designers, consultants, and their clients, as well as our corporate sponsors, to learn about vanguard trends reshaping their professions and the built environment.

Metropolis has always sought out, and featured, the game changers in the architecture and design industry, from emerging talent to established individuals and corporations. Moreover, sustainability and accessibility are major concerns for Metropolis and are often key topics in our magazine, our website and our events.

Horace passed away in March 2014, but his vision carries on. His guiding principles continue to drive Metropolis: cover design in all forms; use the best forms of storytelling; and ask and answer the questions what, why, how, for whom, and for what?

This is what Metropolis is about and why it has long been referred to as the conscience of the industry. —Eugenie C. Havemeyer

Metropolis president Eugenie Cowan Havemeyer is seen in her office, with selections from her archive, including portraits of the magazine’s founder, Horace Havemeyer III.