Foster + Partners Proposes 28-Story Skyscraper for Corporate Campus in Budapest

A large vertical atrium links the tower's seven sky-gardens and culminates in a rooftop public garden.
Foster Partners MOL Campus

MOL Campus view looking towards the old city. Courtesy Foster + Partners

Yesterday, London-based Foster + Partners released renderings for a large project in Budapest, Hungary. The development, which will consolidate the offices of the oil and gas company MOL Group, includes what will be the city’s tallest building.

Foster + Partners positioned the design as a new evolution of the traditional tower-podium typology. A sweeping facade will unite the podium with the tower; this curved exterior will also house an atrium that will run the height of the skyscraper and connect seven sky-gardens. The structure will culminate in a public rooftop garden. “These green spaces also act as a social catalyst throughout the building, encouraging collaboration, relaxation and inspiration by bringing nature closer to the workplace,” says Foster + Partners in a press release. “As we see the nature of the workplace changing to a more collaborative vision, we have combined two buildings–a tower and a podium–into a singular form, bound by nature. As the tower and the podium start to become one element, there is a sense of connectivity throughout the office spaces, with garden spaces linking each of the floors together,” added Nigel Dancey, head of studio at the firm.

The tower will also feature “offset” service cores that will enable large, open plan offices while unspecified “cutting edge technology” will control interior light levels, views, and temperatures. “All occupants have a direct connection to the external environment providing fresh air, daylight, and views, and the building utilizes low and zero carbon energy sources, such as photovoltaics, also featuring rainwater harvesting and storage facilities,” added the firm in its release.

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Categories: Architecture, Workplace Architecture

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