Arts + Culture

Why Architectural Collage is Important to These Three Chicago Architecture Biennial Participants

The recent popularity of architectural collage has led to a lot of cloning and some groaning. But collage is more than an aesthetic—it helps reconceive space in new, often scenographic ways.

The recent popularity of architectural collage has led to a lot of cloning and some groaning. But collage is more than an aesthetic—it helps reconceive space in new, often scenographic ways.

The Architectural “Blob” is Dead, Long Live the “Pile”

The blob ostensibly obliterated the culture of tectonics within architecture, but it was a short-lived fad. Interest has shifted again toward a loosely “aformal” approach—the pile. What are the consequences of architects piling it up?

The blob ostensibly obliterated the culture of tectonics within architecture, but it was a short-lived fad. Interest has shifted again toward a loosely “aformal” approach—the pile. What are the consequences of architects piling it up?

New Exhibit Takes You Inside Hella Jongerius’ Beautiful, Colorful Mind

For Breathing Colour, Jongerius, the art director of color and materials at Vitra, contrasts lightness and brightness, revels in reflection and refraction, and investigates black tones and shadow.

For Breathing Colour, Jongerius, the art director of color and materials at Vitra, contrasts lightness and brightness, revels in reflection and refraction, and investigates black tones and shadow.

Rediscovering Sottsass: A Q&A With Met Curator Christian Larsen

Associate curator of Modern Design and Decorative Arts, Christian Larsen, explains why the Metropolitan Museum of Art decided to revisit and exhibit the "happy" works of Italian designer Ettore Sottsass.

Associate curator of Modern Design and Decorative Arts, Christian Larsen, explains why the Metropolitan Museum of Art decided to revisit and exhibit the “happy” works of Italian designer Ettore Sottsass.

Ai Wei Wei, Herzog de Meuron Warn: You Watch the City, The City Watches You

The trio, who worked together on the 2012 Serpentine Pavilion and 2008's Bird's Nest, have collaborated again—this time for an eerie installation exploring the menacing role surveillance plays in our urban lives.

The trio, who worked together on the 2012 Serpentine Pavilion and 2008’s Bird’s Nest, have collaborated again—this time for an eerie installation exploring the menacing role surveillance plays in our urban lives.

Whatever You Do, Don’t Call Daniel Buren’s Artworks “Installations”

In the first of his series of interviews with architects and artists, Vladimir Belogolovsky interviews renowned conceptual artist Daniel Buren about the fuzzy line between his art and the architecture that holds it.

In the first of his series of interviews with architects and artists, Vladimir Belogolovsky interviews renowned conceptual artist Daniel Buren about the fuzzy line between his art and the architecture that holds it.