Sneak Peek: Poetic License

Murray Moss and Franklin Getchell at Moss were so excited with their latest exhibition, Poetic License, that I asked Franklin to send over some pics. The show, which celebrates rule breaking, envelope pushing, and taking chances—everything a designer should be doing—showcases works that push the boundaries of what’s been done before in a variety of media. You’ll see some launches by young European designers like Michael Anastassiades, Mathias Bengtsson, Finn Magee, and Oskar Zieta, as well as work by standbys like the Campana brothers, Michele De Lucchi, and Patrick Jouin. The show opens May 16, and is a nice kick-off to ICFF. And if you miss the show this weekend, it’s open until June 26.

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These limited-edition metal stools by the young Polish designer/engineer Zieta were created using a new FIDU technology (“free inside pressure forming”) whereby flat welded metals are industrially inflated, forming various stools, chairs, and tables.

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Michael Anastassiades’s motorized Kinetic Lights; and Patrick Jouin’s Bloom .MGX lamps (in the background)—made with 3-D printing

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The Danish designer Mathias Bengtsson’s work in carbon fiber, laser-cut paper, and wood; and Michelle De Lucchi’s monumental Estense cabinet (far right), produced by Design Gallery Milano

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Michelle De Lucchi’s new series of handcrafted walnut trays, called Vassoi da Muro. When not in use, they hang on the wall as models of architectural facades inspired by the ancient poets.

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Francois Roche’s architectural models of idealized habitable constructions and the robots intended to build them, designed by the French architectural firm R&Sie(n). Featured are models from two R&Sie(n) projects: I’ve Heard About (2005) and An Architecture Des Humeurs (2010).

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Fernando and Humberto Campana’s NativoCampana by CORSI, Milano, which includes new works produced in resin in combination with other materials and created especially for Moss. Featured is their group of “Fossils”: playful vessels with various snakes and assorted insects and other creatures (spider shown) embedded in the amber-like resin.

Categories: Arts + Culture

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