Metropolis Magazine - Metropolis Magazine August 2005

 

Well Heeled

“I design my shoes like chairs,” Julia Lundsten says. “The heels are like the chair legs; and the leather uppers, where you place your foot, are like seats.” The Finnish designer is the daughter of an architect and an interior designer, and her desire to work with structural elements led her to study footwear rather than couture. Lundsten feels it…

The Insiders

Metropolis introduces five emerging interior design practices reshaping space and redefining the creative process.

Surprise Fillings

Materially speaking, there’s great variety at Café Darclée—a new Seattle spot serving crepes for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. “The concept came from the simple structure of the crepe itself: flour, egg, and water,” says Julia Sandetskaya, of local interior architecture studio MusaDesign. “When you combine a crepe with interesting fillings, it creates unexpected fusions. So we decided to use materials…

No Rules

At Milan’s Salone Internazionale del Mobile this spring, the conceptualist Swedish product designers of Front exhibited a video game called “The Representation of Things.” They reengineered an existing game to explore qualities of objects that might not be available when working purely in real space—an idea that began as an outgrowth of creating nonmaterial forms with 3-D modeling software. While…

Community Impact

Bentonville—one of the fastest growing cities in northwest Arkansas and the location of Wal-Mart’s headquarters—is getting a new art museum and cultural center. In May the Walton Family Foundation (created by the founder of the giant retail chain) unveiled Moshe Safdie and Associates’ design for the 100,000-square-foot Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, a glass-and-wood structure sited on 100-plus acres…

The Peace Maker

As he works on the landscape at the de Young museum in San Francisco, observers wonder: can Walter Hood bridge the divide between public space and in-your-face architecture?

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