Metropolis Magazine - Metropolis Magazine January 2006

 

TV Frame

Featuring the work of three visual luminaries, Colorcalm’s “By Design” DVD turns flat-screen TVs into frames for ambient artworks. Dutch graphic designer Irma Boom presents shifting vertical bands of color that are based on works by artists from Caravaggio to Ellsworth Kelly. Peter Saville, famous for his New Order album covers, saturates the screen with colors to a sound track…

John Knott: Urban Planning

When John L. Knott Jr. talks about Noisette—his project to redevelop 3,000 acres in depressed North Charleston, South Carolina, over the next 20 years—he doesn’t sound like a man preaching a radical mission. In fact his reasoned tone suggests a motivation so simple as to be obvious: it’s the right thing to do. But what Knott is proposing is actually…

The Art of Dining Act Two: The Theater

David Rockwell has been in love with the theater since he saw Fiddler on the Roof on Broadway when he was eight years old. Here he talks to Metropolis senior editor Paul Makovsky about growing up in the performing arts, highlights some of his favorite stage scenes, and points out the key characteristics that make theater and restaurants such powerful…

Trashlight

Stuart Haygarth’s chandeliers find a surprising source of beauty in discarded trinkets and trash. “I don’t like creating things solely to look good,” the British designer says. “There should be a concept or story behind them.” Haygarth’s interest in garbage and narrative began during his 15 years working as a photographer and illustrator. “It’s object-based work, so I was always…

Jonathan Ive: Product Design

“I don’t ever talk about this,” says Jonathan Ive, attempting to describe the deep working relationship his team has developed over the years. “I don’t think anyone would understand.” As head of design at Apple, he is arguably the most influential product designer in America, if not the world. But he is shy and soft-spoken, with closely cropped hair and…

The Art of Dining Act One: The Set

The first move in restaurant design is almost always a spatial one: the parameters of the box—the stage set, if you will—must be defined before visual themes begin to emerge. At Nobu 57, the Rockwell Group inherited an awkward but highly public location on West 57th Street—home to a former ski shop on the ground floor and, according to Rockwell,…

The Art of Dining

David Rockwell helped create the phenomenon of destination dining. Now his firm brings its unique brand of stagecraft to Nobu 57.

Ada Louise Huxtable: History

When architects put themselves into the same category as art personalities and ignore in every way that their art touches the world, it’s not socially responsible. It has a bad physical effect.

Visionaries: Introduction

Visionary thinking requires optimism. Why bother reaching for the stars if you’re convinced we’re all headed straight to hell? These days genuine optimism is in short supply for a very good reason. We may in fact all be headed for some earthly purgatory involving impending global calamity. So how do we proceed? (Passivity and nihilism are not options.) We think…

John Thackara: Cultural Theory

John Thackara, former director of the Netherlands Design Institute, has spent the past decade championing smart design with a conference series, Web site, and global network—based in Amsterdam and Bangalore—called Doors of Perception. Metropolis senior editor Paul Makovsky spoke to Thackara about his latest project, “Designs of the Time (DOTT)”; his new book, In the Bubble: Designing in a Complex…

Pliny Fisk III / Gail Vittori Architecture

Talking to Pliny Fisk III—one of the pioneers of the sustainable-design movement—is both inspiring and confounding. In any given sitting Fisk might discuss bio-regional mapping, fly ash concrete, cybernetics, and E.F. Schumacher all in the same dizzying context. It’s difficult to grasp, but that’s because he isn’t following a conventional approach. For him the planet’s prosperity is inextricably linked to…

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