Metropolis Magazine - Metropolis Magazine March 2009

 

Sit Pretty in Pink

Until now, Dauphin’s contribution to breast-cancer research was purely behind the scenes. Since 2002, it has donated to the furniture industry’s Common Thread for the Cure Foun­dation. But this year, the Bavaria-based manufacturer takes its commitment public: a forthcoming edition of its Conte chair will feature a pink-leather backrest embossed with the movement’s signature ribbon. The National Breast Cancer Foundation…

Give Me Some Skin

Touted as the notebook of writers—Hemingway supposedly used it—the Moleskine has a slim, sturdy profile that makes it popular with anyone who puts pen to paper (dilettantes included). Designers should be glad to learn that the company will now offer generous A3 and A4 sizes, which are better suited to drawing—with FSC-certified sketching- and watercolor-quality paper to boot. Who said…

Space Oddities

Imagine you are an industrial designer, and this brief lands on your desk: “To build a garment that will hold up under the most extreme circumstances”—so far, so good, you think—“without the astronaut dying.” Would you blanch? That, says the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum’s Amanda Young, the author of Spacesuits (powerHouse Books, 2009), was the daunting challenge for…

Banal Genius

Sam Hecht’s intriguing Under a Fiver collection highlights the ingenuity and folly of some of the world’s most inexpensive objects.

A Call to Arms: Veterans on the Front Lines of Prosthetics Research

The Iraq war has produced thousands of wounded veterans, propelling research into the ultimate ergonomic challenge: the perfect prosthetic.

The Iraq war has produced thousands of wounded veterans, propelling research into the ultimate ergonomic challenge: the perfect prosthetic.
Military amputees now find themselves on the front lines
of prosthetics research, with each new development promising more than mere mobility.

The New Reality: Graduating Class

Given the dismal state of the economy, we decided to ask students completing ten top industrial-design programs (both bachelor’s and master’s) about their career plans. There’s certainly no lack of problems to tackle—environmental, social, or otherwise—but there will likely be fewer jobs to fill, at least for now. Click on the photos to see what some young creative minds have…

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