Metropolis Magazine - Metropolis Magazine October 2010

 

The Green Vanguard: C is for Ceramics

Ceramic tiles have been around for thousands of years, and it’s no wonder. They’re easy to maintain, long lasting, and recyclable—in other words, inherently sustainable. The Italian and Spanish ceramic-tile industries are powerhouses, together accounting for almost 12 percent of world production. They produce high-quality products with a wide variety of decorative and technical applications, ranging from delicate tiles that…

The Green Vanguard: X is for Xeriscaping

Written by Olivier Filippi Published by THAMES & HUDSON After the hottest summer on record, with drought conditions in many parts of the country, the idea of creating a garden that doesn’t need watering is an important one. Olivier Filippi’s new release, The Dry Gardening Handbook: Plants and Practices for a Changing Climate (Thames & Hudson), can help you do just…

The Green Vanguard: M is for Minimalism

Is minimalism an inherently green approach to design? It is, after all, about living with less stuff and choosing items of lasting quality. To test this theory, we called up the “father of architectural minimalism” himself, John Pawson, whose new monograph, Plain Space (Phaidon), presents his studio’s designs from the last ten years. “Well, I think it’s a very difficult…

Systems Thinker

Allan Savory espouses a holistic approach to environmental renewal, tackling problems from the ground up (literally).

The Green Vanguard: B is for Bentley Prince Street

Inspired by precious metals from different regions in the country, Bentley Prince Street’s Domestic Alchemy carpet features a woven, flat-weave construction, making it ideal for high-traffic areas such as retail spaces, institutions, and corporate environments. It is manufactured in a LEED Silver–certified facility in California, powered by one of the country’s first privately owned industrial solar arrays. www.bentleyprincestreet.com October 1,…

The Green Vanguard: W is for Wind Turbines

Designed by Bogle Flanagan Lawrence Silver Today, when wind turbines appear on tall buildings, they tend to be tacked onto roofs like appendages, producing modest amounts of electricity. But a high-rise residential tower that recently opened in London incorporated turbines into the structure of the building for the first time. Looking like a mammoth electric shaver, the Strata SE1’s form…

The Green Vanguard: L is for Linoleum

Green designers love to incorporate the latest technologies in their projects, but they shouldn’t lose sight of tried-and-true solutions. Linoleum is a good example. Developed in the mid-19th century, true linoleum (not vinyl flooring, with which it is often confused) is made primarily of natural materials, including linseed oil, pine resins, limestone, and wood or cork flour. Now in its…

Green Monster

To beautify an airport eyesore, all it takes is 27,000 plants, a high-tech maintenance system, and constant vigilance.

The Green Vanguard: A is for Air Purifier

HUMANSCALE Two years ago, Humanscale rolled out a prototype for a desktop air purifier that it hoped would open up new markets for the company. The debut proved quite successful: we wrote an extensive article on the product, it appeared in the Museum of Modern Art’s Design and the Elastic Mind exhibition, and it won the obligatory NeoCon award. But…

The Green Vanguard: V is for Ventilated Building Facade

HUNTER DOUGLAS Ventilated facade panels are a smart way to make a building more efficient. NBK Terracotta Facade Panels, from Hunter Douglas, not only bring a new design element to the exterior; they act as a rain screen, moving water away from the building envelope, creating a chimney effect that also keeps the building dry and reduces the structure’s thermal…

The Green Vanguard: K is for Koolhaas

OK, alphabetically speaking, we’re fudging this one a bit. “Rem Koolhaas? Green?” we can hear the minions at the U.S. Green Building Council cry. “Who are you kidding?” But we’re evoking Koolhaas here metaphorically. (The Seattle Central Library, by the way, was LEED certified five years ago.) He is the father—maybe the grandfather, since his Delirious New York is more…

It Takes a Village (And an Architect)

WEB: www.moma.org In “The (Limited) Power of Good Intentions” (p. 66), Julie Lasky investigates why socially responsible design initiatives often fail, despite a surfeit of good design, goodwill, and real need. Meanwhile, curators at the Museum of Modern Art, in New York, have put together an exhibition on a handful of such initiatives that have been successfully realized. Opening this…

The Green Vanguard: U is for USM

Designed by Paul Schärer and Fritz Haller Though ecofriendly materials and production methods are crucial for new products, the truth is that the most sustainable design may be the one you keep the longest. A perfect case in point: USM’s Haller line, a modular shelving-and-storage system created in 1963 by Paul Schärer, an engineer, and Fritz Haller, an architect. Its…

The Green Vanguard: J is for J&J/Invision Carpet

The Light collection of carpet tiles is inspired by the way objects capture and reflect light. The two patterns—Diffusion and Aura, the larger-scale of the two—use subtle bands of color to mimic shimmering and iridescent effects. Both have PVC-free backing and are manufactured with a solution-dyed nylon that includes recycled material. www.jj-invision.com October 1, 2010 Categories: Uncategorized

Feel the Japain

DESIGNERS: CuldeSac www.culdesac.es For an exhibition of Spanish design at this year’s Tokyo Designers Week, which begins October 29, the Valencian studio CuldeSac has concocted an intriguing bit of revisionist history. Made in Japain, as the 3,750-square-foot exhibit is called, asserts that “tens of hundreds of thousands of years ago” Spain and Japan were actually one country—Japain!—with one people and…

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