Art

Design Advocates: 5 People Making American Cities Better for All

American cities are in the midst of an urban renaissance, pursuing design, sustainability, and social good. Here are five people helping architects and designers to make our cities better.

American cities are in the midst of an urban renaissance, pursuing design, sustainability, and social good. Here are five people helping architects and designers to make our cities better.

Ai Wei Wei, Herzog de Meuron Warn: You Watch the City, The City Watches You

The trio, who worked together on the 2012 Serpentine Pavilion and 2008's Bird's Nest, have collaborated again—this time for an eerie installation exploring the menacing role surveillance plays in our urban lives.

The trio, who worked together on the 2012 Serpentine Pavilion and 2008’s Bird’s Nest, have collaborated again—this time for an eerie installation exploring the menacing role surveillance plays in our urban lives.

Whatever You Do, Don’t Call Daniel Buren’s Artworks “Installations”

In the first of his series of interviews with architects and artists, Vladimir Belogolovsky interviews renowned conceptual artist Daniel Buren about the fuzzy line between his art and the architecture that holds it.

In the first of his series of interviews with architects and artists, Vladimir Belogolovsky interviews renowned conceptual artist Daniel Buren about the fuzzy line between his art and the architecture that holds it.

Redesigning Citizenship

For “Redesigning Citizenship,” Pratt’s Brooklyn Fashion+Design Accelerator invites five remarkable panelists to each share their experiences of citizenship from the perspectives of art, design, activism, and fashion. Afterwards, panelists and audience will participate in a workshop to co-create a design strategy for the 21st century citizen.

Architecture Enters the Age of Post-Digital Drawing

Setting a design concept to pencil and paper was once considered a core architectural act, but the past two decades’ culture of digital rendering almost killed it. Almost.

Setting a design concept to pencil and paper was once considered a core architectural act, but the past two decades’ culture of digital rendering almost killed it. Almost.