Infrastructure

Design Advocates: 5 People Making American Cities Better for All

American cities are in the midst of an urban renaissance, pursuing design, sustainability, and social good. Here are five people helping architects and designers to make our cities better.

American cities are in the midst of an urban renaissance, pursuing design, sustainability, and social good. Here are five people helping architects and designers to make our cities better.

Q&A: Mia Lehrer on the LA River Revitalization Project

We ask the landscape architect how she feels now the master plan for revitalizing the Los Angeles' River, a "life's work," has been handed to Gehry + Partners.

We ask the landscape architect how she feels now the master plan for Los Angeles’ River Revitalization, a “life’s work,” has been handed over to Gehry + Partners.

Inside DC’s Design Charette for Teens

During week two of the teen design charette for Washington DC’s 11th Street recreational bridge, students learned the history of the project and began sketching/modeling.

During week two of the teen design charette for Washington DC’s 11th Street recreational bridge, students learned the history of the project and began sketching/modeling.

Why We Need Urban Microcenters In Our Cities

Microcenters would contain the necessary infrastructure for transportation, water, sewage, and power—all in the heart of the city.

In 2010, according to the Living Planet Report, 3,500 million people lived in urban areas and estimates project a doubling of that number, to 6,300 million people by 2050. In Mexico, an alarming growth is taking place in our major cities: Guadalajara City is comingling with municipalities such as El Salto, Tlajomulco de Zuñiga, Tlaquepaque, Tonalá, and Zapopan. Monterrey City is…

The Viability and Vision of Oyster-tecture

Oyster-tecture envisions a network of oyster reefs: a continental-scale storm water management system that would spur tourism, aid public health, and create a biologically-rich living laboratory.

Oyster-tecture envisions a network of oyster reefs: a continental-scale storm water management system that would spur tourism, aid public health, and create a biologically-rich living laboratory.

Can “Oyster-Tecture” Actually Save Our Cities?

Because bivalves are incredibly efficient water-filtrators, rehabilitating their populations could help protect coastal cities and communities.

Oyster-tecture is one of several emerging practices that are shifting the way we think about infrastructure. The old ideals behind public works projects were focused only on enhancing people’s lives. Oyster-tecture provides needed services to people while also fostering vibrant, healthy ecosystems. The result is a more affordable, resilient, longer-lasting underpinning that surpasses New Deal-style construction. The technique can be…