KYOGO Textiles Harness a Millennium-Old Weaving Technique

Based on visual motifs from Japanese history, the patterns of the new COIKI collection are best-suited for hospitality interiors.
Coiki014 2

Courtesy KYOGO

In Kyoto, Japan, a four-year-old company is reimagining a 1,200-year-old weaving technique. KYOGO textiles were launched in 2017 by parent company Nishijin Textile Manufacture. Nishijin textiles are formed by weaving dyed silk threads with gold and silver and were historically used in the Imperial Court and Buddhist monks’ robes. KYOGO applies this craft, which has been passed down through generations, to create interior fabrics with layered designs that exhibit dramatic depth and lighting effects depending on the angle of viewing.

KYOGO also interprets Japanese tradition in patterns—most notably in its COIKI collection, a series of 27 distinct fabrics that vary in tone and texture. COIKI008’s hemp leaf motif was once found on Buddhist statues or Kabuki costumes, COIKI013’s Saaya first appeared over 400 years ago in the interiors of the Imperial Family, and COIKI014’s Scale patterns adorned the walls of tombstones and mortuary statuettes from the 3rd to 6th century. The textiles can now be found in wine bars, candy shops, and even the interiors of vehicles.

Making use of a loom wider than the traditional Nishijin loom, KYOGO’s artisans weave large-scale fabrics (without repeats) through a rigorous ten-step design and production process that involves an art director, a designer, a weaver, and an upholsterer. COIKI, along with the manufacturer’s other three collections, is suitable for interior wallcoverings, furniture, clothing, and accessories. KYOGO also fulfills custom orders.

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Categories: Textiles