Metropolis Magazine - Metropolis Magazine April 2005

 

Project: Play

At the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, Hank Koning and Julie Eizenberg weren’t afraid to make a mess.

Crossing Guard

Over the past several years street-crossing signals featuring countdown lights have slowly appeared at intersections in various cities, informing pedestrians how much time they have to cross. In Taipei this idea received a new twist with the addition of a green man that runs increasingly faster as time runs out. The LED figure’s motion is animated in a sequence of…

Big Air

The new Airbus A380—which dwarfs the Boeing 747—is Europe’s huge, high- stakes gamble on the future of international air travel.

The Art of War

A show housed in bunkers on Kinmen Island addresses the legacy of conflict between Taiwan and China.

2nd Story

The recent restoration of a Neutra house uses the master’s original drawings to satisfy the current craze for more space.

Light Tiles

SmartSlab LED panels flaunt superior graphics for everything from small-scale interiors to billboards.

A Smorgasbord of Young Italian Architects

When Americans in the architecture scene look abroad, their focus too often lands on the same celebrity practitioners. In Italy, their gaze falls on Renzo Piano (although some also see Massimilano Fuksas not far in the distance). But what if we could put on special glasses, ones that could dim the blinding brightness of starchitects in the post-Bilbao universe? What…

Desktop Comet

Richard Sapper—designer of the legendary Tizio lamp—has created a new task lamp, the Halley, using LED technology.

Light Years

From the patenting of the incandescent lightbulb in the nineteenth century to the Nobel Prize-winning discovery of light-emitting polymers (PLEDs) in 2000, new technologies have long challenged designers to refine the task lamp. In this time line we present eight of the innovative task lamps of the twentieth century. Among them are an early example of glass used as an…

Instant City

Work has begun on a huge project in South Korea. KPF looks to plan and build a $25 billion town of 100,000 people—in ten years.

Night Lights

When archrivals begin sharing a Munich soccer stadium, it will be the glowing facade that lets fans know who’s up.

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