Metropolis Magazine - Metropolis Magazine May 2008

 

Looking for a Restaurant in Downtown Chicago?

Every year Chicago stakes a new claim on America’s dining map. In repurposed architectural spaces, indoors and out, large plates and small, the Windy City just keeps getting tastier. Check out our listings online and be sure to pick up your own copy of Taste of the Town at NeoCon.

Minimal Makeover

Perhaps best known for his pop forms (think butterfly, tongue, and tulip), Pierre Paulin has a more functionalist past. In 1954 he turned out the Bauhaus-inspired CM 141 desk, which Ligne Roset will rerelease in September as Tanis. The name isn’t the only change—the original melamine surface is now Corian or laminate, and walnut has replaced ash veneer on the…

On Dry Land

The water czar of Las Vegas talks about balancing rapid development with smart land-use and natural-resource planning.

Light in the Attic

Noel Clarke, of 2C Design Studio, recently transformed the neglected attic of his Victorian house in Somerville, Mas­sachusetts, into an immaculate modern work space. Rather than bury the room’s past under layers of Sheetrock, he integrated most of its existing features. “There are ways to make interventions that develop a dialogue between old and new so they feel like they…

Craft on the Dial

Looking to create sustainable jobs for the skilled workers of his hometown, one Indonesian designer produces a handmade radio.

Modern Paradise

Though largely unknown outside of Hawaii, architect Vladimir Ossipoff created a singular body of work that fully utilized the lush tropical climate of his adopted home.

Mobile Home?

The relocation of an early Frank Gehry design raises questions about the nature of architecture.

Classic Revival

This month Rosenthal, the 129-year-old china manufacturer, expands its classic repertoire with Landscape, a tableware series by Patricia Urquiola. Though the cutlery may have been modeled on a seventeenth-century marrow spoon, the collection— which debuted at Ambiente, in Frankfurt—showcases the designer’s penchant for tweaking tradition. The all-white dishes feature geometric patterns that form irregular handles and asymmetrical rims while highlighting…

Moment of Reckoning

Faced last year with severe droughts and floods, we must now embark on a new understanding of our relationship to water.

Compilation Art

The Wolfsonian–Florida International University’s recent discovery of a lost 1936 oil painting by Lloyd Morgan, chief designer of Schultze & Weaver, was an odd and welcome revelation to scholars of the New York–based architecture firm. Jonathan Mogul, a curatorial research associate at the museum, believes that the 6-by-14-foot canvas, a sort of greatest-hits collection of the firm’s work, was once displayed…

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