Metropolis Magazine - Metropolis Magazine October 2006

 

Sculpting Infinity

Erwin Hauer’s enticing wall screens captivated the likes of Marcel Breuer, Philip Johnson, and Florence Knoll Bassett. Now the artist enters the digital age.

Our Ailing Communities

Public-health advocate Richard Jackson argues that the way we build cities and neighborhoods is the source of many chronic diseases.

Good Times

By resisting easy temptations Renzo Piano has ­accomplished something rare: unstrained symbolism.

Lorraine Wild

Lorraine Wild answers a few questions on graphic design, inspiration, and process—using her thumbs.

Diva in the House

The reigning queen of architecture talks about gender-specific buildings, the controversy behind her new Museum of Contemporary-Contemporary Art, and the difference between organic and regular Deconstructivism.

Next Phase: Asymptote 3.0

The day the $1.4 million Alessi flagship store was scheduled to open on Soho’s Greene Street, a dozen or so workers were still stomping over the freshly poured epoxy flooring, heaving a $14,000 La Marzocco espresso machine into its alcove, wiring lighting into custom shelving, touching up vacuum-formed wall fixtures. The contractors had been granted an extra 12 hours to…

Starting Out Small

By building a single-family house on land too tiny for other developers, one young Toronto firm is making a name for itself.

ADA Made Easy

As a US Army captain Hoa Vu witnessed firsthand the needs of the disabled. Now an architecture intern, he has created a quick-reference guide to ADA regulations. Composed of commonly used diagrams and specifications, the 36-by-48-inch poster puts compliance within easy reach. For information on how to order this poster, go here. October 1, 2006 Categories: Uncategorized

City Blocks

Muji’s whimsical New York in a Bag, newly available from the MoMA store, reduces the teeming metropolis to a set of wooden blocks. There are some nondescript office towers, a few cars (presumably taxis), and the usual icons: Lady Liberty, the Chrysler Building, and the Guggenheim. A closer look also reveals Edward Durell Stone and Philip Goodwin’s 1939 MoMA building….

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