Metropolis Magazine - Metropolis Magazine October 2008

 

Pet Project

Pet products are a natural lure for designers—judging from the Best in Show–style theatrics at August’s Pet Fashion Week NY, people are happy to dig deep in their wallets for ­­Fluffy’s Swarovski-studded throne. Fortunately, industrial-design preoccupations such as simple forms, eco-friendly materials, and social responsibility also seem to be coming to a dog dish near you. Here are a few…

Public-Interest Architecture

A new generation of design activists is helping to reshape the role of contemporary architects.

Also featuring Bryan Bell, Teddy Cruz, John Peterson, and Sergio Palleroni

New Malls, Old Ideas

With a handful of new retail projects, several major architects are attempting to bring the much derided mall into the 21st century. But is good design enough?

The Good Life?

A survey of leisure activities on the New York waterfront leaves a lot to be desired—in particular, something to drink.

Do the Strand

A young furniture designer combines traditional craftsmanship with a cheap, sustainable wood product.

Yours for a Price

It used to be that if you wanted to enjoy one of India Mahdavi’s chic little tables you had to hobnob with the demimonde at London’s Bungalow 8, where £10 will buy you a cocktail, if not much dignity. Now, through Ralph Pucci Inter­national, the Parisian designer’s furniture is available in the United States. The 18-piece collection includes the Flower…

Innovation from the Innovators

Metropolis asked some of the world’s most forward-thinking architectural and engineering firms to name their newest green products and systems. Their responses provide a snapshot of state-of-the-art green building.

Classic Zine

More than just the editorial birthplace of California modernism, Arts & Architecture was one of the most influential cultural magazines of the 20th century.

Hope Rising

“He won’t get far on hot air and fantasy!” Jonathan Pryce exclaims in The Adventures of Baron Munchausen. Made from 18th-century knickers, the movie’s dirigible is no more fantastical than Museo Aero Solar, a balloon composed of recycled plastic bags gathered around the world. Since 2007, artists Alberto Pesavento and Tomás Saraceno have held community workshops in seven countries, inviting…

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